Human beings

Ellen Spoelstra worked as our field coordinator in Moria refugee camp on Lesvos. She said goodbye this week. How does she look back on her time in Moria and what did she experience in the crowded refugee camp?

On my last day in Lesvos, I’m looking back on my last few months working in this chaotic camp where not one day has been the same. However, one thing that has unfortunately remained the same is the static, unimproved conditions in the camp and the way people are being treated. From December until now, I’ve seen the situation go from bad to worse in my time here. There are a lot of clearly visible problems; the housing is not proper and the hygiene is poor in the camp. Not too long ago, there were more than 9000 people in Moria – capacity for the camp is 3100. Then, huge news broke that 2000 people would be moved from Lesvos to the mainland. What the news articles didn’t say, was that last month alone around the same amount of people arrived on this island in boats as would be leaving it.

There are other issues in Moria which are even harder to explain to the world. I’m speaking about the mental health situation of the people living in Moria. People have been through a lot in their home countries, but also along their journeys to Lesvos. They come from war zones, have been tortured and/or raped, lost family members and have left everything behind in a search of safety. These people are now all living together in the overcrowded, unsanitary and unsafe Moria. This is not a stable or safe environment, thus causing the troubles of those who already suffer from trauma and PTSD to continue to grow bigger and bigger.

In the clinic, in addition to the wounds and infections, we see a lot of people who suffer from trauma and are in need of professional help. Some people are feeling suicidal, others are brought in with severe panic attacks – watching this it looks as if the patient died and their body stopped working – others are psychiatric patients who are still re-experiencing their past in the form of flashbacks and hallucinations.

The medical team is working hard to address these issues 7 days a week, 2000 consultations a month to cover just a portion of the necessary health care inside the camp. But more is needed.

The PSS-team is working to address this as well with mental health and stress relief classes. The team also makes it possible for children to go to school. There are thousands of children living in Moria, just a small amount of them can follow a structured educational program. Other PSS-programs teach English and computer skills. During library hours, there is space for people to relax, read a book and socialize. The programmes are facilitated by the BRF-volunteers but run by people living in Moria. People who were teachers, IT-managers or students in their home countries and are now helping others with their skills.

I’m honored to have met so many inspiring people living in Moria that are still trying to do their best to help others, despite their own situation. They are volunteering for the PSS programs as teacher, librarian or interpreter and for the medical team as an interpreter. I was lucky enough to work with a group of medical interpreters who are doing an amazing job interpreting critical information to our team and our patients in French, Arabic, Farsi and Somali.

Another great thing to see was the hundreds of volunteers who came to the island the last few months just to work with BRF. People came from different countries and backgrounds, but all had at least one thing in common: the motivation to make a contribution, to help this cause and to not turn away.

It is time that more people in Europe or even in the world are going to take action to make a difference. Especially those who are in power to make a structural change. There are too many camps like Moria where people are being treated like they don’t exist. I’ve used the word ‘people’ 16 times in this post, because that is what the inhabitants of Moria are, human beings.

Text: Ellen Spoelstra
Photo: Kenny Karpov